Rossing Center for Education and Dialogue

The Rossing Center for Education and Dialogue is an interreligious organization based in Jerusalem which promotes an inclusive society for all religious, ethnic and national groups. Through education, encounter, research and consulting, the Rossing Center promotes better relations between Jews, Christians and Muslims in the Holy Land.

Our Goals

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Create and deepen relationships across religious lines despite differences and disagreement

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Contribute to understanding and appreciation of the other’s religious/cultural/national narrative, traditions, beliefs and practices

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Combat prejudices and negative stereotypes

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Our Programs

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Dialogue and Identity

Spurs curiosity, knowledge, intercultural communication and relationship-building among Israel’s Jewish, Christian and Muslim schoolchildren.

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Open House

A grassroots, interfaith, and intercultural hub building shared society in Ramle by the city’s residents from its diverse Jewish, Muslim and Christian communities.

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JCJCR

Teaching the past and present of Christian communities in the Holy Land to Israeli teachers, tour guides, pre-and post-national service youth and IDF educators.

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ADAShA

Brings groups – interreligious or interested in interreligious issues – to Israel and exposes them to an ‘across the spectrum’ educational experience of religious and political narratives and perspectives.

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Educating for Change

Builds educators’ skills in facilitating conflict-related discussions among high school students, encouraging their respect for difference and diversity, and their role as enablers of an inclusive society

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Meeting Place

Promoting a more inclusive campus for students Jewish, Christian and Muslim – Israelis and Palestinians – through joint study and dialogue groups.

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Healing Hatred

An innovative model for interreligious dialogue based on the tools of spiritual counselling.

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Know Your Neighbor

A reliable, simple and coherent database for explorers of the Holy Land’s three Abrahamic faiths.

Rossing Center Events and Updates

Earlier this week far-right MK Bezalel Smotrich (leader of the Religious Zionism party) attacked the Arab members of Knesset and by inference at least, all Arab citizens of Israel saying, “You’re here by mistake, it’s a mistake that Ben-Gurion didn’t finish the job and didn’t throw you out in 1948.” The appalling cultural resonance of that remark makes the lack of condemnation by mainstream Jewish leaders all the more shameful.
At the beginning of the school year, both parents and children are eager to find out who their homeroom teacher will be, particularly in grade school. This year, one appointment reached the national news......
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The Rossing Center in 2020

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Tishrei Holidays

Rosh Hashanah literally means “the head of the Year.” However, the association of this name, with the festival celebrated at the beginning of the Hebrew month of Tishrei only dates from Talmudic times. In the Torah, the festival is called both Yom Teruah, “the day of blowing the Shofar,” and Yom HaZikkaron, “the day of remembrance.” The association of this time of the year with a time of renewal probably goes back toExodus 23:16, when Sukkot, the autumn harvest festival, is identified with “the end of the year,” the intention most likely being the completion of the agricultural cycle. But the creative spirit of the Talmudic Rabbis infused Rosh Hashanah as the New Year with a much deeper meaning—the Day of Judgement, in a process called Teshuvah. That word literally means “response” or “return”, but carries with it a number of other associations, including repentance, renewal and, as some 20th century rabbis and scholars have put it, a kind of re-creation of the Self, in dialogue with God.
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Our Partners

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